Jump to search Jump to main navigation Jump to main content Jump to footer navigation

HiWING Mechanical & Electrical Technology Corporation

Last Modified: Nov. 6, 2012
Other Name: 中国海鹰机电技术研究院; China Haiying Electro-Mechanical Technology Academy (CHETA); Third Academy of CASIC; Coastal Defense (Anti-Ship) Missile Academy; Cruise Missile Academy; China Haiying Company (CHC)
Location: Beijing, China
Subordinate To: China Aerospace Science and Industry Corporation (CASIC)
Size: 40,000,000 RMB in capital[1]
Facility Status: Active

Established on 18 November 1993, HiWING Mechanical & Electrical Technology Corporation is the corporate successor to the Third Academy of the China Aerospace Science and Industry Corporation (CASIC), established in September 1961.[2] While the group’s Chinese name 中国海鹰机电技术研究院 (Zhongguo Haiying Jidian Jishu Yanjiuyuan) has remained consistent since 1993, its English name was changed from China Haiying Electro-Mechnical Technoloy Academy (CHETA) to HiWING. It is China's first research institute authorized to engage in imports and exports.[3] HiWING conducts general research, design, development, and production of anti-ship and land-attack cruise missiles.

The U.S. Government sanctioned HiWING (“China Haiying Company”) and other entities in 1993 for exporting Category II items in the MTCR Annex to Pakistan.[4] The Clinton administration waived these sanctions on 1 November 1994.[5]

Currently HiWING produces missile systems, including the DH-10 and YJ-63 land attack cruise missiles and the YJ-62, YJ-82 and YJ-83 anti-ship cruise missiles.[6] The DH-10 has a range of 1,500+ km and, according to Jane’s Information Group, could be capable of deploying a 20 to 90 kiloton nuclear warhead.[7] HiWING also produces YJ-1 and YJ-8 anti-ship missiles, sold internationally as the C-801 missile.[8] This missile design was constructed by Iran’s Islamic Revolutionary Guards Corps since the early 1990s.[9] HiWING is working to develop intercontinental ranged cruise missiles with ranges over 8,000km.[10] In addition, Mark A. Stokes and Dean Cheng say the organization is engaging in preliminary research for hypersonic combustion ramjet (scramjet) propulsion, capable of accelerating weapons platforms beyond Mach 5, or five times the speed of sound.[11]

The Third Academy has multiple subsidiaries, including:[12]

  • The 3rd Design Department, conducts research and design for cruise missiles.
  • The 31st Research Institute, also known as the Beijing Institute of Propulsion Machinery, conducts research and design for cruise missile propulsion.
  • The 33rd Research Institute, also known as the Beijing Institute of Automated Control Equipment, conducts research, design and simulation for cruise missile control systems.
  • The 35th Research Institute, also known as the Beijing Huahang Radio Measurement Institute, conducts research and design for sensor arrays.
  • The 303rd Research Institute, conducts testing and standardization of cruise missiles.
  • The 304th Research Institute, conducts research and design for software.
  • The 306th Research Institute, also known as the Beijing Institute of Special Materials and Applications, conducts research and design for materials.
  • The 310th Research Institute, conducts general research and analysis for CASIC's Third Academy.
  • The 8357 Research Institute, also known as the Jinhang Institute of Computers and Communications, conducts research and design for automated cruise missile systems.
  • The 8358 Research Institute, also known as the Tianjin Jinhang Institute of Technical Physics, conducts research and design for cruise missile targeting.
  • The 8359 Research Institute, also known as the Beijing Institute of Special Machinery, conducts research and design for missile launchers.
  • The 159 Factory, also known as the Beijing Xinghang Electromechanical Equipment Factory, manufactures cruise missiles, notably the DH-10 cruise missile.
  • The 239 Factory, also known as the Beijing Hangxing Manufacturing Corporation, manufactures and tests digital hardware and software arrays.

 

Sources:
[1] “公司简介 [Company Profile],” HiWING Mechanical & Electrical Technology Corp., www.hiwingtech.com; Mark Stokes, “China’s Evolving Conventional Strategic Strike Capability: The Anti-Ship Ballistic Missile & Beyond,” Project 2049 Institute, 14 September 2009.
[2] “公司简介 [Company Profile], HiWING Mechanical & Electrical Technology Corp., www.hiwingtech.com.
[3] “公司简介 [Company Profile] HiWING Mechanical & Electrical Technology Corp., www.hiwingtech.com.
[4] Shirley A. Kan, “China and Proliferation of Weapons of Mass Destruction and Missiles: Policy Issues,” Congressional Research Service, 30 March 2012, p. 71.
[5] “Waiver of Missile Technology Proliferation Sanctions on Foreign Persons,” United States Department of State, Federal Register 59, Number 214, FR Doc No: 94-27470, 7 November 1994.
[6] Mark Stokes, “China’s Evolving Conventional Strategic Strike Capability: The Anti-Ship Ballistic Missile & Beyond,” Project 2049 Institute, 14 September 2009.
[7] “DH-10,” Jane’s Weapons: Naval 2013, 2 August 2012, www.janes.com.
[8] “CSS-N-4 ‘Sardine’ (YJ-8/C-801); CSS-N-8 ‘Saccade’ (YJ-2/YJ-82/YJ-12/C-802/Noor or Koor),” Jane’s Underwater Warfare Systems 2012, Jane’s Information Group, 16 March 2011, www.janes.ihs.com.
[9] “China Opens Missile Plant in Iran,” United Press International, 23 April 2010, www.upi.com.
[10] Ian Easton, “The Assassin under the Radar: China’s DH-10 Cruise Missile Program,” Project 2049 Institute, 1 October 2009.
[11] Mark A. Stokes, and Dean Cheng, “China’s Evolving Space Capabilities: Implications for U.S. Interests,” Prepared for: the U.S.-China Economic and Security Review Commission, Project 2049 Institute, 26 April 2012.
[12] Mark Stokes, “China’s Evolving Conventional Strategic Strike Capability: The Anti-Ship Ballistic Missile & Beyond,” Project 2049 Institute, 14 September 2009.

CNS logo

This material is produced independently for NTI by the James Martin Center for Nonproliferation Studies at the Monterey Institute of International Studies and does not necessarily reflect the opinions of and has not been independently verified by NTI or its directors, officers, employees, or agents.

Country Profile

Flag of China

China

This article provides an overview of China’s historical and current policies relating to nuclear, chemical, biological and missile proliferation.

Learn More →