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China Aerospace Science and Technology Corporation (CASC)

Last Modified: Aug. 10, 2012
Other Name: 中国航天科技集团公司; formerly part of the China Aerospace Corporation (also called CASC)
Location: Beijing, China
Subordinate To: General Armaments Department, People’s Liberation Army[1]
Size: 120,000 employees, including more than 30 scholars of the Chinese Academy of Sciences (CAS) and the Chinese Academy of Engineering (CAE)[2]
Facility Status: Operational

To increase competition and innovation in China’s missile and aerospace sector, in 1999 the State Council divided the China Aerospace Corporation into the China Aerospace and Technology Corporation (CASC) and the China Aerospace and Industry Corporation (CASIC).[3] CASC engages in the research, design, manufacture and launch of space systems, as well as long-range strategic ballistic missiles and their components. In 2008, CASC consolidated resources to develop a division focusing on “inertial measurement units, telemetry, and missile-related microelectronics, such as the high performance digital signal processors and field programmable gate arrays that are needed for long-range precision strike at high speeds and extreme temperature conditions.”[4]

In 2009, CASC acquired China Satellite Communications Corporation (China Satcom), expanding its activities into the operation of telecommunications satellites.[5] CASC also offers defense systems, such as such as vehicle air defense, ship-to-air missile, surface-to-air, and portable missile weapon systems, as well as unmanned aerial vehicles (UAVs), precision guided bombs, and guided multiple-launch rockets.[6]

CASC was the primary contractor for the ShiJian-6 Group-04 satellites launched by China in October 2010.[7] At the 8th China International Aviation and Aerospace Exhibition (2010 Zhuhai Airshow), CASC exhibited UAV’s with brochures claiming capabilities in battlefield reconnaissance, fire adjustment, data relay, intelligence collection, ground-strike missions and electronic warfare (EW) missions.[8]

As with other defense conglomerates in China, the principal actors in many of these industries are CASC’s subordinate enterprises. CASC controls over 125 enterprises.[9] The following are most notable:

Academies:

Specialized Companies:

  • China Satellite Communications Corporation
  • China Great Wall Industry Corporation
  • China Aerospace Engineering Consultation Center
  • China Centre for Resources Satellite Data and Application (CRESDA)
  • Aerospace Science & Technology Finance Co., Ltd
  • Aerospace Capital Holding Co. Ltd
  • China Aerospace Times Electronics Corporation
  • China Aerospace International Holding LtdBeijing Shenzhou Aerospace Software Technology Co., Ltd
  • Shenzhen Academy of Aerospace Technology
  • Aerospace Long-March International Trade Co., Ltd[10]

Sources:
[1] Mark Stokes with Dean Cheng, “China’s Evolving Space Capabilities: Implications for U.S. Interests,” Project 2049, 26 April 2012, p. 5.
[2] “公司简介 [Company Profile],” China Aerospace Science and Technology Corporation,2011, www.spacechina.com.
[3] Evan Medeiros, Robert Cliff, Keith Crane, and James D. Mulvenon, “A New Direction for China's Defense Industry,” RAND Corporation, 2005, p. 53.
[4] Mark Stokes with Dean Cheng, “China’s Evolving Space Capabilities: Implications for U.S. Interests,” Project 2049, 26 April 2012, p. 17.
[5] Alanna Krolikowski, “China’s Civil and Commercial Space Activities and their Implications,” Testimony before the U.S.-China Economic and Security Review Commission, 11 May 2011, p. 8.
[6] Mark A. Stokes, “China's Strategic Modernization: Implications for US National Security,” September 1999, p. 165.
[7] “China Aerospace and Technology Corporation (CASC),” Jane’s Space Systems and Industry, 18 October 2010.
[8] Wendell Minnick, “China Developing Armed/Recon UAVs,” Defense News, 24 November 2010, www.defensenews.com.
[9] “公司简介 [Company Profile],” China Aerospace Science and Technology Corporation,2011, www.spacechina.com.
[10] Evan Medeiros, Robert Cliff, Keith Crane, and James D. Mulvenon, “A New Direction for China's Defense Industry,” RAND Corporation, 2005, p. 64.

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This material is produced independently for NTI by the James Martin Center for Nonproliferation Studies at the Monterey Institute of International Studies and does not necessarily reflect the opinions of and has not been independently verified by NTI or its directors, officers, employees, or agents.

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