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State Administration for Science, Technology and Industry for National Defense (SASTIND)

Last Modified: July 13, 2012
Other Name: 国家国防科技工业局; Commission of Science, Technology, and Industry for National Defense (COSTIND) 国防科技工业委员会
Location: Beijing, China
Subordinate To: Ministry of Industry and Information Technology (MIIT)
Size: The commission is a comprehensive administrative office of the state for national defense science, technology and industries.
Facility Status: Operational

SASTIND is the premier civilian regulatory authority in China and reports directly to the Ministry of Industry and Information Technology (MIIT).[1] Their primary responsibilities include drafting guidelines, policies, laws and regulations related to science, technology and industry for national defense.[2] This includes researching future weapon systems, scientific development of dual-use systems, and managing the exports of developed weaponry.[3] Universities researching defense technologies report directly to SASTIND. In regards to the domestic control and export of nuclear materials SASTIND works closely with both the Ministry of Commerce and the China Atomic Energy Authority (CAEA), SASTIND’s bureaucratic subordinate.

SASTIND plays an important role in regulating Chinese exports of sensitive military items and has the responsibility for vetting China's conventional military exports, including missile-related exports.[4] The organization also monitors the internal transfers of weapon research and production licenses through an internal legal framework that encompasses various government agencies.[5] At a 2010 meeting at MIIT, SASTIND Director Chen Qiufa stated that the organization’s primary goal for the 12th Five Year Plan was to facilitate “at least 15 percent year-to-year growth of the military industrial economy.”[6]

In accordance with the Civilian Nuclear Safety Equipment Supervision and Management Regulations SASTIND’s primary goal is to ensure civil nuclear safety supervision via the management of equipment and personnel.[7]

Sources:
[1] “China’s Program for Science and Technology Modernization: Implications for American Competitiveness,” The U.S.-China Economic and Security Review Commission, January 2011, p. 111.
[2] “Department of Civilian-Military Integration Promotion,” Ministry of Industry and Information Technology, http://jmjhs.miit.gov.cn.
[3] “中华人民共和国工业和信息化部人民解放军总装备部第13号令 [Ministry of Industry and Information Technology Ministry of People's Liberation Army General Armament Department of the First 13 Orders],” The Office of Scientific and Technological Industry of National Defence in Shandong Province, 5 May 2010, www.sdostind.gov.cn.
[4] Federal Office of Economics and Export Control, “Cooperation in Export Control of Dual-Use Goods,” German Federal Government, www.bafa.de.
[5] “中华人民共和国工业和信息化部人民解放军总装备部第13号令 [Ministry of Industry and Information Technology Ministry of People's Liberation Army General Armament Department of the First 13 Orders],” The Office of Scientific and Technological Industry of National Defence in Shandong Province, 5 May 2010, www.sdostind.gov.cn.
[6] Thomas G. Mahnken, “China’s Anti-Access Strategy in Historical and Theoretical Perspective,” Journal of Strategic Studies, 2011.
[7] “民用核安全设备监督管理条例 [Supervision and Management Regulations for Civilian Nuclear Equipment],” State Council of the People’s Republic of China, 28 May 2010, www.gov.cn.

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This material is produced independently for NTI by the James Martin Center for Nonproliferation Studies at the Monterey Institute of International Studies and does not necessarily reflect the opinions of and has not been independently verified by NTI or its directors, officers, employees, or agents.

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