Russia, U.S. Could Work Together to Secure Syrian Chemical Arms: Biden

Syrian rebel fighters move into position in Homs province on Jan. 20. U.S. Vice President Joseph Biden reportedly suggested to Russia's foreign minister that the two nations could collaborate to secure Syria's chemical arms if the Assad regime collapses (AP Photo/Yong Homsi Lens).
Syrian rebel fighters move into position in Homs province on Jan. 20. U.S. Vice President Joseph Biden reportedly suggested to Russia's foreign minister that the two nations could collaborate to secure Syria's chemical arms if the Assad regime collapses (AP Photo/Yong Homsi Lens).

U.S. Vice President Joseph Biden reportedly suggested on Saturday that Russia and the United States could work together to ensure that Syria's chemical arms stocks remain protected following a potential collapse of the Assad regime, according to the Washington Post.

Biden is said to have raised the idea while meeting in Munich with Russian Foreign Minister Sergei Lavrov.

Russia has worked to prevent strong action by the U.N. Security Council in response to the Syrian civil war that has killed more than 60,000 people.

The conflict has forced the United States and partner nations to prepare for the possible use or loss of control of the Assad government's large stockpile of nerve and blister agents and delivery systems.

The Syrian chemical arms complex is believed to be scattered around the country. Previous reports have indicated it could take as many as 75,000 troops to secure the sites.

New satellite images indicate there was no damage to a Syrian research site close to Damascus from a recent Israeli air assault, Reuters reported.

The Jan. 30 attack is believed to have targeted Syrian vehicles suspected of transporting antiaircraft weapons to the militant organization Hezbollah in neighboring Lebanon. News reports indicated that the airstrike might have produced collateral damage to a nearby facility said to be key to Syria's biological and chemical weapons activities.

February 7, 2013
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U.S. Vice President Joseph Biden reportedly suggested on Saturday that Russia and the United States could work together to ensure that Syria's chemical arms stocks remain protected following a potential collapse of the Assad regime, according to the Washington Post.

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