White House Requests $27M For NYC Radiation Detection

The Obama administration is requesting $27 million in its fiscal 2012 budget for an antiterrorism program primarily aimed at protecting New York City from nuclear and radiological attacks, the Associated Press reported yesterday (see GSN, Feb. 23, 2010).

The Securing the Cities program installs radiation detectors in and around New York that would alert authorities to materials entering or exiting the city that could be used in a nuclear or radiological "dirty bomb" attack.

The Obama White House had twice attempted in previous budgets to eliminate federal support for the initiative. Senator Charles Schumer (D-N.Y.) said Washington has come to understand that supporting terrorism defense initiatives such as Securing the Cities is a federal duty (Associated Press/New York Post, Feb. 14).

"The Securing the Cities program is an absolutely vital security program, for the New York City/Long Island metropolitan area and for the nation as a whole," Representative Peter King (R-N.Y.) said in a press release. "New York City remains al-Qaeda’s top terror target, as evidenced by the at least 11 failed or foiled terror plots in New York City since 9/11. A radiological or nuclear attack in New York City would not only inflict a deadly toll in New York, but would also devastate the entire national economy" (U.S. Representative Peter King release, Feb. 14).

The Obama administration also requested more than $1.5 billion for other federal antiterrorism programs, Schumer said in a press release. The Urban Areas Security Initiative would receive $920 million, while the Transportation Security Grant Program and Port Security Grant Program would reach receive $300 million (U.S. Senator Charles Schumer release, Feb. 14).

February 15, 2011
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The Obama administration is requesting $27 million in its fiscal 2012 budget for an antiterrorism program primarily aimed at protecting New York City from nuclear and radiological attacks, the Associated Press reported yesterday (see GSN, Feb. 23, 2010).