Kimia Maadan Company (KM)

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Last Updated: January 1, 2011
Other Name: Kimia Madan
Location: N/A
Subordinate To: Private company; contracted by Atomic Energy Organization of Iran (AEOI)
Size: Unknown
Facility Status: Inactive since 2003

Kimia Maadan (KM) was a private Iranian company involved in Iran's alleged "Green Salt" project. The clandestine program allegedly involved research on uranium processing, high explosives and a missile warhead design. [1] "Green Salt" is a synonym for uranium tetra fluoride (UF4), a precursor for uranium hexafluoride (UF6) in the chemical process to convert uranium dioxide (UO2) into UF6. [2] Western intelligence obtained documents describing Iranian plans for the bench-scale conversion of UO2 into UF4. [3] The secretive, laboratory-scale nature of the project triggered concerns about a potential Iranian break-out scenario, i.e. the production of weapons-grade fissile material for nuclear weapons outside of the country's safeguards agreement with the IAEA. [4] Another reason for concern is that the documents obtained by Western intelligence indicate administrative links between the alleged "Green Salt" project and work on a missile re-entry vehicle. [5]

The Atomic Energy Organization of Iran (AEOI) also contracted KM to develop the Gchine uranium mine. According to the IAEA, "KM's task was to do the detailed design, to procure and install equipment and to put the Gchine UOC (Uranium Conversion Plant) into operation." [6] The IAEA also reported that KM had purchased components on behalf of the AEOI in order to circumvent international sanctions that had been imposed on the AEOI. [7]

Sources:
[1] Elaine Sciolino and William J. Broad, "Iran's Civilian Nuclear Program may Link to Military, U.N. Says," The New York Times, 1 February 2006, www.nytimes.com.
[2] Peter Crail, "Questions Surround Iran's Nuclear Program," Arms Control Association, www.armscontrol.org.
[3] "Iran's Nuclear Programme: A Collection of Documents, Volume 2," Presented to Parliament by the Secretary of State for Foreign and Commonwealth Affairs by Command of Her Majesty," GOV/2008/15, June 2008, Annex, p.1, www.publications.parliament.uk.
[4] Mark Fitzpatrick, "Assessing Iran's Nuclear Program," Survival, Autumn 2006, vol. 48, n. 3, pp. 5-26.
[5] "Kimia Maadan," Iran Nuclear Sites, NuclearIran, Institute for Science and International Security, www.isisnucleariran.org.
[6] IAEA, "Implementation of the NPT Safeguards Agreement and Relevant Provisions of Security Council Resolutions 1737 (2006), 1747 (2007) in the Islamic Republic of Iran," 22 February 2008, www.iaea.org.
[7] IAEA, "Implementation of the NPT Safeguards Agreement and Relevant Provisions of Security Council Resolutions 1737 (2006), 1747 (2007) in the Islamic Republic of Iran," 22 February 2008, www.iaea.org.

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This material is produced independently for NTI by the James Martin Center for Nonproliferation Studies at the Middlebury Institute of International Studies at Monterey and does not necessarily reflect the opinions of and has not been independently verified by NTI or its directors, officers, employees, or agents. Copyright 2017.