Nuklearna Elektrana Krsko (NEK) Nuclear Power Plant

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Last Updated: June 10, 2014
Other Name: Krkso
Location: Krsko, Slovenia, 40 km from Zagreb
Subordinate To: Formerly Sava Power Station (Savska Elektrana, Slovenia) and Zagreb Electricity Utility (Elektroprivreda Zagreb, Croatia); presently, Elektrogospodarstvo (EGS, Slovenia) and Hrvatska Elektroprivreda (Croatia)
Size: Net capacity 676 Mwe; Gross capacity 707 MWe.
Facility Status: N/A

In 1973, the U.S. firm Westinghouse was selected over Germany's Kraftwerk Union to construct Yugoslavia's first nuclear power plant at Krsko. The construction began in 1974, and according to Yugoslav media, the country's industry built 68% of the plant. Test production of electricity commenced in August 1981, and in June 1984, the Krsko plant began operation at full capacity. The reactor is co-owned by Slovenia and Croatia. This pressurized water reactor (PWR) is the only power reactor still in operation in the former Yugoslavia. All construction expenses were divided 50/50 between the two nations. During most of the 1990s, Croatia and Slovenia engaged in to a dispute over the Krsko plant. The dispute involved compensation owed by Croatia to Slovenia for provided electricity and ownership issues. At one point in 1998, Slovenian parliament passed a decree privatizing the plant and stopping the supply of electricity to Croatia. In December 2001, Croatia and Slovenia signed an agreement regarding the ownership of the Krsko nuclear power plant, ending a decade long dispute. Under the agreement, the two countries will become equal co-owners of the plant, draw and equal share of energy, and assume responsibility for nuclear waste management. The two countries agreed to set July 1, 2002 as the deadline for ratification by both parliaments. As of January 2004, the issue has not been resolved.

Source:
[1] Nada Stanic, "Krsko is Focus of Dispute Between Slovenia and Croatia," Nucleonics Week, Vol. 35, No. 4, January 27, 1994 , via Lexis-Nexis.
[2] The plant's power has been listed elsewhere as 632 MW ("Krsko Nuclear Plant to Begin Test Production," Borba, August 18, 1981, in FBIS, Doc. No. FBIS-EEU-81-159); and 664 MW (Nada Stanic, "Yugoslavia Aiming to Define Next 20 Years of Nuclear Growth by Year End," Nucleonics Week, Vol. 22, No. 9, March 5, 1981, via Lexis-Nexis), and 615 MW ("Yugoslavia Takes PWR," Nuclear Engineering International, December 1973, p. 919; "Yugoslavia: Contract for First Nuclear Plant," Nuclear Engineering International, August 1974, p. 624).
[3] "Yugoslavia Takes PWR," Nuclear Engineering International, December 1973, p. 919; "Yugoslavia: Contract for First Nuclear Plant," Nuclear Engineering International, August 1974, p. 624.
[4] "Krsko Nuclear Plant to Begin Test Production," Borba, August 18, 1981, in FBIS, Doc. No. FBIS-EEU-81-159; "Krkso Nuclear Powerplant at Full Operation," Tanjug, 12 February 1982, in FBIS, Doc. No. FBIS-EEU-82-030.
[5] "Krkso Nuclear Powerplant at Full Operation," Tanjug, 12 February 1982, in FBIS, Doc. No. FBIS-EEU-82-030; Nada Stanic, "Yugoslavia Aiming to Define Next 20 Years of Nuclear Growth by Year End," Nucleonics Week, Vol. 22, No. 9, March 5, 1981, via Lexis-Nexis.
[6] "Current situation of plants in Yugoslavia," Wise News Communique, September 14, 1990.
[7] "Slovene Government Privatizes Krsko Nuclear Power Plant," Radio Slovenia, 3 August 1998 in BBC Monitoring International Reports, August 3, 1998; "Croatia, Slovenia Reach Deal on Sharing Nuclear Plant," Agence France-Presse, July 20, 2001.
[8] "Croatia, Slovenia Reach Deal on Sharing Nuclear Plant," Agence France-Presse, July 20, 2001; "Slovenia, Croatia Sign Agreement on Contentious Nuclear Plant," Agence France-Presse, December 19, 2001; Nada Stanic, "Deadline Passes with Settlement for Krsko Disputes Still Uncertain," Nucleonics Week, Vol. 43, No. 28, July 11, 2002.
[9] Nada Stanic, "Krsko is Focus of Dispute Between Slovenia and Croatia," Nucleonics Week, Vol. 35, No. 4, January 27, 1994, via Lexis-Nexis; "Croatia Settles Debt With Krsko Nuclear Plant," Ljubljana Radio Slovenia Network, 11 March 1993, in FBIS, 16 March 1993, Doc. No. FBIS-EEU-93-049.

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