Beijing Wanyuan Industry Corporation

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Last Updated: February 1, 2001
Other Name: 北京万源工业公司
Location: 48 km south of Beijing, China
Subordinate To: Civilian and private trading company for the China Academy of Launch Vehicle Technology (CALT)
Size: Over 3000 employees, including over 400 researchers, advanced engineers and technical staff [1]
Facility Status: Active

Beijing Wan Yuan Industry Corporation (BWYIC) is the subordinate private trading firm for the China Academy of Launch Technology (CALT), though its current status with CALT is unclear. [2] The former Ministry of Space Industry (MSI) established BWYIC in 1982 to serve as a business cover and sub-contractor for private deals by the First Academy, now CALT. [3] The U.S. Government sanctioned BWYIC and other entities in 1993 for exporting Category II items in the MTCR Annex to Pakistan, but waived them on 1 November 1994. [4]

BWYIC has been extensively involved in CALT’s missile production, but later began diversifying its business portfolio into civilian fields. According to some sources, BWYIC designed the DF-5 inertial guidance system, was involved in vehicle electronics and propellant tank domes, and conducted research on telemetry, rocket engine control, and rocket propulsion. [5] Currently it appears that BWYIC supports the testing of ballistic missiles for CALT, including the DF-3, [6] DF-21, [7] DF-31, [8] and DF-41. [9]

As of 2004, BWYIC marketed systems including integration, control systems, electronic information technology, machine equipment, environmental protection and energy conservation, and safety & security engineering. [10] The balance between military and dual-use activities in BWYIC’s portfolio is unclear.

Source:
[1] “公司简介 [Company Introduction],” Beijing Wan Yuan Industries (Group) Corporation, www.spacewanyuan.com, 8 September 2006 (Website now defunct; accessed through Archive.org on 16 October 2012).
[2] “公司简介 [Company Introduction],” Beijing Wan Yuan Industries (Group) Corporation, www.spacewanyuan.com, 8 September 2006 (Website now defunct; accessed through Archive.org on 16 October 2012).
[3] 1982 date is from “公司简介 [Company Introduction],” Beijing Wan Yuan Industries (Group) Corporation, www.spacewanyuan.com, 8 September 2006 (Website now defunct; accessed through Archive.org on 16 October 2012); First Academy reference is from Hua Di, “China’s Case: Ballistic Missile Proliferation,” in Potter and Jencks eds., The International Missile Bazaar: The New Suppliers’ Network (Westview Pr, 1993) p. 165.
[4] Shirley A. Kan, “China and Proliferation of Weapons of Mass Destruction and Missiles: Policy Issues,” Congressional Research Service, 30 March 2012, p. 71.
[5] Dr. Howard Olrik DeVore, “China’s Aerospace and Defense Industry,” Jane’s Information Group, December 2000, pp. 397-411.
[6] DF-3 (CSS-2), Jane’s Strategic Weapon Systems, 8 August 2012, www.janes.com.
[7] DF-21 (CSS-5), Jane’s Strategic Weapon Systems, 28 September 2012, www.janes.com.
[8] DF-31 (CSS-9), Jane’s Strategic Weapon Systems, 28 August 2012, www.janes.com.
[9] DF-41 (CSS-X-10), Jane’s Strategic Weapon Systems, 7 September 2012, www.janes.com.
[10] “公司简介 [Company Introduction],” Beijing Wan Yuan Industries (Group) Corporation, www.spacewanyuan.com, 8 September 2006 (Website now defunct; accessed through Archive.org on 16 October 2012).

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