Academy of Aerospace Propulsion Technology

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Last Updated: October 25, 1996
Other Name: 航天推进技术研究院; 航天六院; Base 067; CASC Sixth Academy; Academy of Space Propellant; [1] Shaanxi Lingnan Machinery Corporation [2]
Location: Shaanxi Province
Subordinate To: China Aerospace Science and Technology Corporation (CASC)
Size: 10,000 personnel [3]
Facility Status: Active

The Academy of Aerospace Propulsion Technology is a research and development center for liquid fueled propulsion systems, including engines and inertial guidance systems for launch vehicles. It has over five associated research facilities and four factories. [4] This academy was originally established in the post 1965 rush to build facilities in the Third Line (regarded as a massive development of industry in China’s south-western interior), and manned by transfers from the Seventh Ministry’s First Academy and the New Technological Bureau of the Chinese Academy of Sciences. [5] Originally centered in the Qinling Mountain, the 067 Base is now centered in Xi’an, and responsible to the China Aerospace Science and Technology Corporation (CASC). [6]

The academy’s more recent products include the YF-77 and YF-100 rocket engines. The YF-77 uses liquid hydrogen (LH2) as fuel and liquid oxygen (LOX) as oxidizer, and the YF-100 uses Kerosene as fuel and liquid oxygen (LOX) as oxidizer. These rocket engines power the Changzheng-5 (Long March-5), China’s next-generation heavy-lift space launch vehicle for commercial satellites and space station modules. [7] In June 2012, the Chinese State Administration of Science, Technology and Industry for National Defence announced that it had developed a new 120-ton liquid engine for carrier rockets in support of manned space and lunar probe missions; the Academy of Aerospace Propulsion Technology was the lead in developing the new engine. [8]

Important departments, institutes and factories include the following:

  • 11th Research Institute, Xi'an Aerospace Propulsion Institute
  • 101 Research Institute, Beijing Institute of Aerospace Testing Technology
  • 165 Research Institute
  • 801st Research Institute, Shanghai Institute of Space Propulsion
  • 7103 Factory
  • 7414 Factory, Xi'an Hanxing Factory
  • Xi'an Aerospace Measurement and Test Center [9]

Sources:
[1] Mark Stokes, Dean Cheng, “China’s Evolving Space Capabilities: Implications for U.S. Interests,” Project 2046, 26 April 2012, pp. 18-19.
[2] Major Mark A. Stokes, “China's Strategic Modernization: Implications for US National Security,” September 1999, pp. 165.
[3] Mark Stokes, Dean Cheng, “China’s Evolving Space Capabilities: Implications for U.S. Interests,” Project 2046, 26 April 2012, pp. 18-19.
[4] “China's Aerospace and Defence Industry: Appendix A – Industry Directory,” Jane’s Information Group, 5 December 2000.
[5] John W. Lewis and Xue Litai, “The Missile,” China’s Seapower: The Politics of Force Modernization in the Nuclear Age (Stanford: Stanford University Press, 1994), p. 170.
[6] Mark Stokes, “China’s Evolving Conventional Strategic Strike Capability,” Project 2049, 14 September 2009, pp. 83.
[7] Mark Stokes, Dean Cheng, “China’s Evolving Space Capabilities: Implications for U.S. Interests,” Project 2046, 26 April 2012, pp. 18-19.
[8] “China Develops New Rocket Engine,” Xinhua News Agency, 14 June 2012.
[9] Mark Stokes, “China’s Evolving Conventional Strategic Strike Capability,” Project 2049, 14 September 2009, pp. 83-86.

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