Nuclear Power Institute of China (NPIC)

View All China Facilities

Last Updated: September 29, 2011
Other Name: 中国核动力研究设计院; Southwest Reactor Engineering Research and Design Academy; 西南反应推工程研究中心
Location: Chengdu, Sichuan
Subordinate To: China National Nuclear Corporation (CNNC)
Size: 3,700 employees, 5 research institutes, over 90 laboratories[1]
Facility Status: Operational

The Nuclear Power Institute of China (NPIC), formally known as the Southwest Reactor Engineering Research and Design Academy, has both civilian and military functions.[2] NPIC designed and built China’s first pressurized water reactor (PWR), its first high flux reactor (HFR), its first pulse reactor, as well as the Min Jiang Test Reactor (MJTR).[3] NPIC has converted its two HEU-fueled research reactors to low enriched uranium (LEU). The 125 MWt High Flux Experimental and Test Reactor (HFETR) reached criticality in 1979 and was converted to LEU fuel in 2007. The 5 MWt Min Jiang Test Reactor (MJTR) reached criticality in 1991 and was converted to LEU fuel in 2007.[4]

NPIC is actively involved in reactor design and safety research, and produces medical isotopes.[5] NPIC was a main partner in the development of the CNP-1000, and is developing fuel technologies for use in China’s CANada Deuterium-Uranium (CANDU) reactors.[6]

Sources:
[1] “院情简介 [Introduction to the Institute],” Nuclear Power Institute of China, www.npic.ac.cn.
[2] “院情简介 [Introduction to the Institute],” Nuclear Power Institute of China, www.npic.ac.cn.
[3] “院情简介 [Introduction to the Institute],” Nuclear Power Institute of China, www.npic.ac.cn.
[4] Hui Zhang, “China’s HEU and Plutonium Production and Stocks,” Science & Global Security, 19:1, 2011, p. 74.
[5] “核动力研究设计 [Nuclear Power Research Plants],” Nuclear Power Institute of China, www.npic.ac.cn.
[6] “Nuclear Power in China,” World Nuclear Association, September 2011, www.world-nuclear.org.

Country Profile
Flag of China
China

This article provides an overview of China’s historical and current policies relating to nuclear, chemical, biological and missile proliferation.

Learn More →

This material is produced independently for NTI by the James Martin Center for Nonproliferation Studies at the Middlebury Institute of International Studies and does not necessarily reflect the opinions of and has not been independently verified by NTI or its directors, officers, employees, or agents. Copyright 2016.