Last Updated: September 30, 2011
Other Name: N/A
Location: Taechon-kun (태천군), Pyonganbuk-do (평안북도), North Korea
Subordinate To: Yongbyon Nuclear Research Center (영변원자력연구센터), General Department of Atomic Energy (원자력총국), Cabinet (내각)
Size: 25 Mega-electron volts [1]
Facility Status: Unknown

North Korea received its B-25 Betatron facility from the Soviet Union in 1966 as a part of the 1959 agreement on "the peaceful use of atomic energy," which provided for Soviet assistance in establishing a North Korean nuclear research institute. [2] The Betatron was designed as a gamma radiography facility, and it has been used as a pulsed neutron source to measure cross sections. [3]

Sources:
[1] Gregory Karouv, “A Technical History of Soviet-North Korean Nuclear Relations,” in James Clay Moltz and Alexandre Y. Mansourov, eds., The North Korean Nuclear Program: Security, Strategy, and New Perspectives from Russia (New York: Routledge, 2000), p. 17.
[2] Il-Young Kim and Lakhvinder Singh, “The North Korean Nuclear Program and External Connections,” Korean Institute for Defense Analyses, Spring 2004, www.kida.re.kr; Bertil Lintner, “Pyongyang's 60-year Obsession,” Asia Times, 10 October 2006, www.atimes.com.
[3] Gregory Karouv, “A Technical History of Soviet-North Korean Nuclear Relations,” in James Clay Moltz and Alexandre Y. Mansourov, eds., The North Korean Nuclear Program: Security, Strategy, and New Perspectives from Russia (New York: Routledge, 2000), p. 17.

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