Chemical Plant Complex

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Last Updated: March 1, 2011
Other Name: Dera Ghazi Khan Conversion Facility
Location: Outside of Dera Ghazi Khan
Subordinate To: Pakistan Atomic Energy Commission (PAEC)
Size: Appears to be a single building on a 200km² lot
Facility Status: Unknown

The Chemical Plant Complex is located near Dera Ghazi Khan, close to the BC-1 Uranium Mill. The facility was supplied by CES Kalthof G.m.b.H of Freiburg, Germany, and began operations in 1980. [1] Although imagery analysis shows expansion of facilities at the Dera Ghazi Khan site, [2] Pakistani officials claim that the facilities closed following the Baghalchore mine closure. [3] However, if operations are continuing at the Chemical Plant Complex, they may involve processing and converting uranium ore from the Nanganai and Taunsa mines.

There have been recent attacks on the Dera Ghazi Khan site, including a 2003 ground attack [4] and a 2006 mortar attack. The Balochistan Liberation Army, a separatist terrorist organization, is reportedly responsible for both attacks. [5]

Sources:
[1] Leonard Spector, Nuclear Ambitions: The Spread of Nuclear Weapons 1989-1990 (Boulder: Westview Press, 1990), p. 114.
[2] David Albright, Paul Brannan, and Robert Kelley, "Pakistan Expanding Dera Ghazi Khan Nuclear Site: Time for U.S. To Call for Limits," Institute for Science and International Security, 19 May 2009. www.isis-online.com.
[3] "Officials say U.S. claim of Pakistan expanding uranium enrichment sites 'faulty,'" BBC Monitoring South Asia, 21 May 2009, www.lexisnexis.com.
[4] David Albright, Paul Brannan, and Robert Kelley, "Pakistan Expanding Dera Ghazi Khan Nuclear Site: Time for U.S. To Call for Limits," Institute for Science and International Security, 19 May 2009. www.isis-online.com.
[5] Chaim Braun, "Security Issues Related to Future Pakistani Nuclear Power Program," Nuclear Policy Education Center, 13 September 2006, www.npolicy.org.

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This material is produced independently for NTI by the James Martin Center for Nonproliferation Studies at the Middlebury Institute of International Studies at Monterey and does not necessarily reflect the opinions of and has not been independently verified by NTI or its directors, officers, employees, or agents. Copyright 2017.