Pentagon Seeking Permission to Boost Missile Defense Funding

The Pentagon is seeking congressional permission to reallocate funds to its program for homeland ballistic missile defense, Inside Defense reports.

The Defense Department needs all four Capitol Hill defense committees to sign off on its request to redirect $187.5 million toward ballistic missile-defense activities. The majority of that amount -- $167 million -- would go to the Ground Based Interceptor program. The long-range interceptor is a critical component of the Ground-based Midcourse Defense system, which is the country's principal line of defense against a limited intercontinental ballistic missile strike.

As proposed by the department's new comptroller, Mike McCord, in a July 10 reprogramming request to Congress, the funds would be shifted out of fiscal 2012, 2013 and 2014 military accounts. In total, the Pentagon is looking to reallocate $4.4 billion.

"This reprogramming action provides funding in support of higher-priority items based on unforeseen military requirements, than those for which originally appropriated and are determined to be necessary in the national interest," the 78-page reprogramming request states.

July 16, 2014
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The Pentagon is seeking congressional permission to reallocate funds to its program for homeland ballistic missile defense, Inside Defense reports.

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