U.S. Lauds Myanmar's Acceptance of Heightened Atomic Inspections

International Atomic Energy Agency Director General Yukiya Amano, left, and Myanmar Foreign Affairs Union Minister H.E. U Wunna Maung Lwin shown Tuesday in Vienna during a signing ceremony for a safeguards agreement that grants U.N. inspectors more access to nuclear sites in Myanmar (International Atomic Energy Agency photo).
International Atomic Energy Agency Director General Yukiya Amano, left, and Myanmar Foreign Affairs Union Minister H.E. U Wunna Maung Lwin shown Tuesday in Vienna during a signing ceremony for a safeguards agreement that grants U.N. inspectors more access to nuclear sites in Myanmar (International Atomic Energy Agency photo).

The United States on Thursday applauded Myanmar for signing a legal document that permits heightened international inspections of both known and suspected nuclear sites in the country, the Associated Press reported.

Myanmar's Tuesday signing of the International Atomic Energy Agency's Additional Protocol will support bringing the formerly isolated country "increasingly in line with international nonproliferation norms and standards," the State Department said.

Nations that sign the protocol are granting IAEA inspectors greater physical access to sites in their country, the ability to conduct snap inspections of facilities and more information about their atomic activities.

For years, the United States and most Western nations shunned the former military junta-run government in Myanmar. The junta was repeatedly accused of engaging in illegal conventional weapons commerce with North Korea. Some nonproliferation experts also suspect the Southeast Asian state of at one point collaborating with the North on establishing a secret nuclear program.

Since 2011, Myanmar's officially civilian-led government has carried out a number of economic, political and human rights reforms that have led the United States and other nations to relax sanctions against the country.

September 20, 2013
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The United States on Thursday applauded Myanmar for signing a legal document that permits heightened international inspections of both known and suspected nuclear sites in the country, the Associated Press reported.

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