CTBT Chief Looks to U.S. Movement on Treaty After Election

The United States could take up the debate over ratifying the Comprehensive Test Ban Treaty after the November presidential election, Kyodo News on Tuesday quoted the head of the international body formed to manage the accord regime as saying.

"I remain hopeful that after the election, there would be resumption in the efforts of the administration" to secure Senate approval for the pact, Tibor Tóth, who leads the Preparatory Commission for the Comprehensive Test Ban Treaty Organization, said during an August visit to Japan.

The Obama administration has publicly and repeatedly announced its intention to bring the treaty to the Senate for ratification. It has become clear, though, that any such move would not occur ahead of the election. Meanwhile, an administration informational campaign on the matter continues on Capitol Hill.

Issue experts have said that presumptive Republican presidential nominee Mitt Romney is not likely to pursue treaty approval if he defeats President Obama in November.

The United States is one of 44 "Annex 2" nations that must fully sign off on the treaty before it can enter into force. It is among eight holdouts from that group; the others are China, Egypt, India, Iran, Israel, North Korea and Pakistan.

Senators previously dismissed ratification in 1999. At that point, not one facility had been formally approved for sensing illicit nuclear test blasts, Tóth said. There has been "both qualitative and quantitative progress" since then in establishing the detection web, which now encompasses 85 percent of a planned 337 International Monitoring System sites.

 

 

Aug. 22, 2012
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The United States could take up the debate over ratifying the Comprehensive Test Ban Treaty after the November presidential election, Kyodo News on Tuesday quoted the head of the international body formed to manage the accord regime as saying.

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