Interceptor-Dodging Russian ICBM Could Take 10 Years to Prepare

Russia would require at least another decade to equip its armed forces with a planned ICBM designed to evade U.S. missile interceptors, a missile production company in the country stated in Tuesday comments reported by RIA Novosti (see GSN, Dec. 16, 2011).

Moscow last December said it would prepare the silo-based, liquid-fueled ICBM as a successor to the R-36M Voyevoda missile. Russia's armed forces referenced the concept for such a weapon roughly three years ago.

The United States plans between now and 2020 to deploy increasingly advanced sea- and land-based missile interceptors around Europe as a proclaimed hedge against a potential ballistic missile attack from Iran. The Kremlin says it suspects that next-generation U.S. interceptors planned for Europe could have the ability to target its strategic nuclear forces (see related GSN story, today).

Russian strategic missile forces head Lt. Gen. Sergei Karakayev last year said the military's solid-fueled strategic weapons might be vulnerable to interception by U.S. antimissile systems.

It is difficult to estimate how long the new ICBM would require to prepare, according to Andrei Goryaev, deputy head of the Russian missile production firm NPO Mashinostroyeniya.

“Statistics says it will take about 10 years,” Goryaev said. “If the country has not done it for 30 years then difficulties are inevitable” (RIA Novosti, May 8).

May 8, 2012
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Russia would require at least another decade to equip its armed forces with a planned ICBM designed to evade U.S. missile interceptors, a missile production company in the country stated in Tuesday comments reported by RIA Novosti.

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