U.S. Pacific Commander Seeks Chinese Transparency

A senior U.S. military official called on China today to open up about its military policies and plans, including Beijing's goals regarding antisatellite technology, Reuters reported (see GSN, Jan. 11).

"Increased transparency can lead to greater trust that reduces the potential for misunderstanding," said U.S. Pacific Command chief Adm. Timothy Keating during a visit to Beijing.  "Misunderstanding can lead to conflict or crisis and that is very much not in our interest."

Keating said that areas of concern include Chinese plans to develop long-range cruise missiles and antisatellite weapons, one of which China tested about one year ago (see GSN, Jan. 19, 2007).

Chinese officials told him that Beijing's goals were purely defensive, Keating said.

"The Chinese military officials with whom I had discussions emphasized their desire to protect those things that they think are theirs and nothing more," he told reporters, seemingly referring to Taiwan (see GSN, Jan. 2).  "They (the Chinese) specifically have no hegemonic intentions, they do not have any expansion strategy, they advocate a peaceful rise" (Lindsay Beck, Reuters/Washington Post, Jan. 15).

January 15, 2008
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A senior U.S. military official called on China today to open up about its military policies and plans, including Beijing's goals regarding antisatellite technology, Reuters reported (see GSN, Jan. 11).