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Russia’s Mixed Signals on Nonproliferation

July 19, 2012

Russian President Putin with Chinese President Hu Jintao alongside the June 2012 SCO Summit Russian President Putin with Chinese President Hu Jintao alongside the June 2012 SCO Summit
Government of China

Does Russian President Vladimir Putin’s decision to attend the Shanghai Cooperation Organization (SCO) rather than the Group of Eight (G8) represent a break in Russia’s commitment to global nonproliferation policy?  A new issue brief by Helen Kei and Bryan Lee of the Monterey Institute of International Studies explores what some interpret as a deepening split between Moscow and Washington.

“Despite the obvious importance of China, Putin’s choice to skip a meeting with the leaders of the largest Western economies to attend a summit with the impoverished nations of Central and South Asia immediately raised questions among observers and pundits about Russia’s future foreign policy direction.”

The analysis suggests that the general consensus between the countries on nonproliferation policy will continue, though notes some potentially serious differences between Russia and the West.

Read the paper.

About

A new issue brief by Helen Kei and Bryan Lee of the Monterey Institute of International Studies explores what some interpret as a deepening split between Moscow and Washington on global nonproliferation policy.

Understanding
the Nuclear Threat

Reducing the risk of nuclear use by terrorists and nation-states requires a broad set of complementary strategies targeted at reducing state reliance on nuclear weapons, stemming the demand for nuclear weapons and denying organizations or states access to the essential nuclear materials, technologies and know-how.

In Depth