Sam Nunn

Co-Chairman, NTI

Former U.S. Senator Sam Nunn is co-chairman of NTI. He served as chief executive officer of NTI for 16 years, until June 2017, and continues to bring his deep experience and expertise to our projects. He served as a U.S. Senator from Georgia for 24 years, from 1972 to 1996.

In addition to his work with NTI, Nunn has continued his service in the public policy arena as a distinguished professor in the Sam Nunn School of International Affairs at Georgia Tech and as chairman emeritus of the board of the Center for Strategic and International Studies in Washington, DC.

Nunn attended Georgia Tech, Emory University and Emory Law School, where he graduated with honors in 1962. After active duty service in the U.S. Coast Guard, he served six years in the U.S. Coast Guard Reserve. He first entered politics as a member of the Georgia House of Representatives in 1968.

During his tenure in the U.S. Senate, Nunn served as chairman of the Senate Armed Services Committee and the Permanent Subcommittee on Investigations. He also served on the Intelligence and Small Business Committees. His legislative achievements include the landmark Department of Defense Reorganization Act, drafted with the late Senator Barry Goldwater, and the Nunn-Lugar Cooperative Threat Reduction Program, which provided assistance for more than 20 years to Russia and the former Soviet republics for securing and destroying their excess nuclear, biological and chemical weapons.

Analysis

Ensuring Euro-Atlantic Security

In the lead up to the Munich Security Conference, Des Browne, Wolfgang Ischinger, Igor Ivanov and Sam Nunn write on key steps that can be taken to reduce the risk of confrontation in the Euro-Atlantic region.

Rising Nuclear Dangers: Steps to Reduce Risks in the Euro-Atlantic

This report, Rising Nuclear Dangers: Steps to Reduce Risks in the Euro-Atlantic Region, by NTI's Robert E. Berls, Jr. and Leon Ratz offers recommendations to avoid accidents, enhance predictability, and build confidence between the West and Russia.

On nuclear weapons, nations must cooperate to avoid catastrophe

President Obama’s visit to Hiroshima comes almost 71 years after the conclusion of a world war that was fought and ended with tremendous sacrifice, huge casualties and immense devastation. Today, global nuclear arsenals are capable of destroying not only cities but also civilization itself.

View All Analysis