Iranian Ballistic Missile Models

This article is a companion piece to Iran's missile page.

Name: Simorgh SLV
Other names: None;
Type: Ballistic/ Space Launch Vehicle
Length: 26 m
Diameter: 2.4 m
Payload: 60 kg satellite/ 100-200kg warhead
Range: 4000 km+
Status: Operational

Sources: 

Name: Emad
Other names: None
Type: Ballistic
Length: 16 m
Diameter: 1.25 m
Payload: 750 kg
Range: 1700 km+
Status: Operational

Sources:
[1] Norbert Brugge, “The North-Korean/Iranian Nodong-shahab missile family”, 07 August 2016, www.b14643.de.
[2] “Iran Transfers Batch of Emad Missiles to New Underground Missile Town,” FARS News Agency, January 2016, farsnews.com
[3] “Iran tests new precision-guided ballistic missile,” Reuters, October 2015, reuters.com [4] “Iran’s Rocket and Missile Forces and Strategic Options,” Center for Strategic and International Studies, October 2014, csis.org
[5] “Iran: Politics, Gulf Security, and U.S. Policy,” Congressional Research Service, August 2016, made available by the Federation of American Scientists, fas.org
[6] Tim Hume, “Iran test-fires new generation long range ballistic missiles, state media report”, CNN, 11 October 2015, www.cnn.com
[7] S/RES/2231 (2015), un.org

Name: Ghadr-1
Other names: Ghadr-110, قدر-110, Shahab-3A
Type: Ballistic
Length: 15.6 m
Diameter: 1.25 m
Payload: 750 kg
Range: 1,500-1,800 km
Status: Development

Sources:
[1] Theodore Postol, "A Technical Assessment of Iran's Ballistic Missile Program," Technical Addendum to the Joint Threat Assessment on Iran's Nuclear and Missile Potential, 6 May 2009, www.ewi.info.
[2] "Iran’s Ballistic Missile Capabilities: A Net Assessment," Dossier, London: IISS: International Institute for Strategic Studies, 2010, pp. 17‐23.
[3] “Shahab 3/4 (Ghadr‐1),” Jane’s Strategic Weapons Systems, Jane’s Information Group, 12 February 2012, www.janes.com.

Name: Shahab-2
Other names: شهاب-2, R-17M Elbrus, Hwasong-6, SS-1-C, Scud-C 
Type: Ballistic
Length: 10.94 – 11.5 m
Diameter: 0.88 m
Payload: 770 kg
Range: 500 km
Status: Operational

Sources:
[1] Theodore Postol, "A Technical Assessment of Iran's Ballistic Missile Program," Technical Addendum to the Joint Threat Assessment on Iran's Nuclear and Missile Potential, 6 May 2009, www.ewi.info.
[2] "Iran’s Ballistic Missile Capabilities: A Net Assessment," Dossier, London: IISS: International Institute for Strategic Studies, 2010, pp. 13‐16.
[3] "Shahab 2 (Qiam, SS‐1D 'Scud C variant)," Jane's Strategic Weapons Systems, Jane's Information Group, 12 February 2012, www.janes.com.
[4] “SHAHAB 2 (‘SCUD C’ VARIANT),” Missile Threat – George C. Marshall, 1 March 2014, missilethreat.com.
[5] Hans Kristensen, "Shahab-2 (Scud C)," Federation of American Scientists, December 14, 2006, http://fas.org.
[6] "'Scud C' variant (Hwasong 6), 'Scud D' variant (Hwasong 7, and 'Scud ER')" Jane's Strategic Weapons System, Jane's Information Group, 11 March 2015, www.janes.com.
[7] "Rocket Aerodynamics," NASA, accessed 26 June 2015, http://exploration.grc.nasa.gov.
[8] Barbara Pierre, "Shahab-2," Missile Defense Advocacy Alliance, 15 April 2014, www.missiledefenseadvocacy.org.

Name: Shahab-3
Other names: شهاب-3
Type: Ballistic
Length: 16.58 m
Diameter: 1.38 m
Payload: 760-1,100 kg
Range: 800-1,000 km
Status: Operational

Sources: 
[1] Theodore Postol, "A Technical Assessment of Iran's Ballistic Missile Program," Technical Addendum to the Joint Threat Assessment on Iran's Nuclear and Missile Potential, 6 May 2009, www.ewi.info.
[2] "Iran’s Ballistic Missile Capabilities: A Net Assessment," Dossier, London: IISS: International Institute for Strategic Studies, 2010, pp. 13‐16.
[3] "Shahab 3," Jane's Strategic Weapons Systems, Jane's Information Group, www.janes.com.

Name: Sejil-2
Other names: 2-سجیل, Sejjil-2
Type: Ballistic
Length: 18 m
Diameter: 1.25 m
Payload: 750 kg
Range: 2,000 - 3,000 km
Status: Development

Sources:
[1] Iran’s Ballistic Missile Capabilities: A Net Assessment, Dossier, London: IISS: International Institute for Strategic Studies, 2010, pp. 54‐63.
[2] Jeffrey Lewis, "Iran Claims Solid-Fueled 2 Stage Sejjil," Arms Control Wonk, 13 November 2008, http://armscontrolwonk.com.
[3] Geoffrey Forden, "Japan Weighs in on the Sejil," Arms Control Wonk, 2 November 2009, http://armscontrolwonk.com.
[4] Ted Postol, “Technical Addendum to the Joint Threat Assessment on Iran’s Nuclear and Missile Potential – The Sejjil Ballistic Missile,” EastWest Institute, 31 May 2009, www.ewi.info.
[5] “Sejil (Ashoura),” Jane’s Strategic Weapon Systems, 12 February 2012, www.janes.com.

July 1, 2015
Table of Contents:
About

This page contains interactive 3D missile models for Iran. Users can drag the model by pressing and holding their mouse’s scroll wheel. They can zoom in and out on the model by rolling their scroll wheel up and down, and can orbit the model by clicking and dragging their left mouse button.

This material is produced independently for NTI by the James Martin Center for Nonproliferation Studies at the Middlebury Institute of International Studies and does not necessarily reflect the opinions of and has not been independently verified by NTI or its directors, officers, employees, or agents. Copyright 2016.