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CNS Global Incidents and Trafficking Database

Providing free and open access to centralized information on nuclear and other radioactive material that has been lost, stolen, or is otherwise out of regulatory control, the new Global Incidents and Trafficking Database and Report prepared by the James Martin Center for Nonproliferation Studies (CNS) offers researchers and policymakers a unique resource to assess the nature and scope of nuclear security risks.

The database relies on a mix of official (e.g., regulatory agencies) and unofficial (e.g., media reports) to collect reports of incidents where material has gone out of control. In addition to a brief description, the database includes twenty descriptive categories that break down each incident. The annual report highlights relevant key findings and implications for policymakers working to improve nuclear security.

The database currently covers incidents that were reported from January 2013 to June 2014. The database includes 153 incidents recorded in 2013 and 80 incidents for the first half of 2014 (January – June). The 2013 report analyzes these initial 153 incidents and breaks them down into six key findings, and relevant policy implications. A 2014 report will be issued once data from the second half of 2014 becomes available.   

As the resource matures and additional years of data are added, the database will enable researchers to examine trends and assess the impact of new policies designed to reduce the nuclear security risks posed by materials out of regulatory control.

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This material is produced independently for NTI by the James Martin Center for Nonproliferation Studies at the Monterey Institute of International Studies and does not necessarily reflect the opinions of and has not been independently verified by NTI or its directors, officers, employees, or agents.

About

Providing free and open access to centralized information on nuclear and other radioactive material that has been lost, stolen, or is otherwise out of regulatory control, the new Global Incidents and Trafficking Database and Report prepared by the James Martin Center for Nonproliferation Studies (CNS) offers researchers and policymakers a unique resource to assess the nature and scope of nuclear security risks.

Understanding
the Nuclear Threat

Reducing the risk of nuclear use by terrorists and nation-states requires a broad set of complementary strategies targeted at reducing state reliance on nuclear weapons, stemming the demand for nuclear weapons and denying organizations or states access to the essential nuclear materials, technologies and know-how.

In Depth