House Budget Resolution Ups Funding for Nukes

The chairman of the U.S. House Appropriations Committee on Monday submitted a continuing budget resolution that would provide additional money to nuclear arms activities, even while fixing funding for most government functions at current levels.

The budget bill would keep the federal government operating to March 27, 2013, six months after the next fiscal year begins on Oct. 1.

It is needed because the Senate has not signed off on any budget legislation, House panel Chairman Hal Rogers (R-Ky.) said in a press release. He noted that the full House has approved seven of 12 bills forwarded by his committee.

“I’m deeply disappointed that the House and Senate were unable to complete appropriations bills before the end of the fiscal year. My committee members worked relentlessly to produce legislation that adequately and responsibly funds the federal government, and did so in a timely manner," Rogers said. "Unfortunately, with the Senate’s inaction and election-year politics in play, our committee’s bills will not be negotiated before the end of the fiscal year, and therefore a temporary funding Band-Aid is necessary to prevent a government shutdown."

The continuing resolution would provide a half-year funding rate equivalent to the Obama administration's $7.6 billion request for fiscal 2013 nuclear-weapon activities at the Energy Department's semiautonomous National Nuclear Security Administration. The total administration request for operations intended to ensure a safe, secure and reliable nuclear arsenal is $363 million more that Congress appropriated for this budget year.

The bill would also provide $100 million for "domestic uranium enrichment research, development and demonstration" under NNSA defense nuclear nonproliferation programs.

Both the House Appropriations and Budget committees are set to consider the budget resolution.

September 11, 2012
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The chairman of the U.S. House Appropriations Committee on Monday submitted a continuing budget resolution that would provide additional money to nuclear arms activities, even while fixing funding for most government functions at current levels.

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