Japan Floats Rules for Missile Interceptor Sales

Preliminary Japanese rules would permit the United States to sell a cooperatively designed missile interceptor to other governments as long as there were mechanisms for preventing the resale of the system and related materials, the Yomiuri Shimbun reported on Friday (see GSN, June 16).

The United States wants authority to export the jointly produced Standard Missile 3 Block 2A interceptor to Europe for use in a planned NATO missile defense system, according to previous reports.

A recipient of the Standard Missile 3 Block 2A interceptor must have in place internal commerce regulations and data protection schemes, and it must be a member of relevant international control systems, according to the proposed regulations. The standard might permit exports of the weapon to NATO and Missile Technology Control Regime member states that have joined the General Security of Military Information Agreement with Japan, insiders said on Thursday.

In addition, the rules would require sales of the interceptor to aid Japan in countering missile threats from North Korea and elsewhere. Such a sale might prompt countries near the island nation to adopt a warier attitude toward use of their ballistic missile arsenals, or to eliminate such weapons entirely.

Japan would also permit exports of the interceptor that aid in curbing the spread of ballistic missiles, the Yomiuri Shimbun reported (Yomiuri Shimbun, July 29).

August 1, 2011
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Preliminary Japanese rules would permit the United States to sell a cooperatively designed missile interceptor to other governments as long as there were mechanisms for preventing the resale of the system and related materials, the Yomiuri Shimbun reported on Friday (see GSN, June 16).

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