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Hagel Orders Review of Security at All Military Installations

People on Monday are escorted out of the building where a deadly shooting rampage occurred at the Washington Navy Yard in Washington. In the wake of the killings, the Pentagon is planning a review of security practices at U.S. military installations (AP Photo/Jacquelyn Martin). People on Monday are escorted out of the building where a deadly shooting rampage occurred at the Washington Navy Yard in Washington. In the wake of the killings, the Pentagon is planning a review of security practices at U.S. military installations (AP Photo/Jacquelyn Martin).

Defense Secretary Chuck Hagel on Wednesday announced he had ordered a review of physical security and access at all global U.S. military installations following Monday's deadly mass shootings in Washington.

At a Pentagon press briefing, the Defense chief said he additionally called for a separate review into the military's procedures for granting and renewing security clearances.

Navy Secretary Ray Mabus also has ordered a security assessment of all U.S. naval installations in response to the Washington Navy Yard shooting spree, allegedly by a former reservist. The incident shed light on apparent security gaps that can allow felons unrestricted access to various facilities, Bloomberg reported on Tuesday.

Mabus wants the assessment of base protections turned in to him no later than Oct. 1.

Aaron Alexis, a government contractor and onetime Navy reservist, is accused of killing 12 civilian workers at the Washington Navy Yard prior to his own shooting death by responding law enforcement officials.

There has been no evidence of any terrorism ties to the shooting spree, which was one of the largest in U.S. history at a military installation.

Alexis, 34, gained entry to the Navy Yard using his official identification badge, which he received as a government contractor. He still had security clearance from his time with the Navy Reserve even though he exited the military in 2011 after several incidents where he displayed questionable conduct.

The security review was ordered following the disclosure that an unpublished Defense Department inspector general's report had concluded that "potentially numerous felons may have been able to gain unrestricted access to several military installations across the country due to the insufficient background checks, increasing the risk to our military personnel and civilian employees," according to a letter from Representative Mike Turner (R-Ohio).

As recently as last October, roughly 3.5 million U.S. citizens had confidential or security clearances, according to the Office of the director of National Intelligence.

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