Opinion

Perry, Kissinger, Nunn in the WSJ: Building on George Shultz’s Vision of a World Without Nuclear Weapons

Perry, Kissinger, Nunn in the WSJ: Building on George Shultz’s Vision of a World Without Nuclear Weapons

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Henry A. Kissinger

Chairman of Kissinger Associates, Inc., former U.S. Secretary of State

For the past 15 years, the three of us and a distinguished group of American and international former officials and experts have been deftly and passionately led by our late friend and colleague, George Shultz. Our mission: reversing the world’s reliance on nuclear weapons, to prevent their proliferation into potentially dangerous hands, and ultimately ending them as a threat to the world. Without a bold vision, practical actions toward that goal won’t be perceived as fair or urgent. Without action, the vision won’t be perceived as realistic or possible.

George led this charge with the tenacity of a U.S. Marine and the wisdom of a man who held four cabinet positions for two presidents, including secretary of state for Ronald Reagan. Reagan considered nuclear weapons to be “totally irrational, totally inhumane, good for nothing but killing, possibly destructive of life on earth and civilization.” He took that view and his most trusted advocate for it, George Shultz, to a summit with Soviet leader Mikhail Gorbachev in Reykjavik, Iceland, in 1986.

Read the full article at WSJ.com here.

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The best way for our leaders to remember the dead on Armistice Day? Do everything they can to avoid a nuclear war

Opinion

The best way for our leaders to remember the dead on Armistice Day? Do everything they can to avoid a nuclear war

This weekend marks the 100th anniversary of the end of the First World War, one of the world’s most horrific conflicts. One of the best accounts of how this tragedy began, by the historian Christopher Clark, details how a group of well-meaning European leaders – “The Sleepwalkers” – led their nations into a war with 40 million military and civilian casualties. Today, we face similar risks of mutual misunderstandings and unintended signals, compounded by the potential for the use of nuclear weapons – where millions could be killed in minutes rather than over four years of protracted trench warfare. Do we have the tools to prevent an incident turning into unimaginable catastrophe?


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