Ghulam Ishaq Khan Institute of Engineering Sciences and Technology (GIKI)

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Last Updated: September 27, 2011
Other Name: N/A
Location: Topi, Khyber Pakhtunkhwa
Subordinate To: Higher Education Commission, Pakistan Engineering Council
Size: 93 faculty and staff, ~750 undergraduates, additional graduate students [1]
Facility Status: Operational

The Ghulam Ishaq Khan Institute of Engineering Sciences and Technology (GIKI) is one of Pakistan's leading centers for training engineering and technology personnel. Dr. A.Q. Khan led the development of the Institute and served as director, “hoping to mass produce a legion of metallurgists and engineers honed in the image of the benefactor.” [2] The institute was founded to address Pakistan’s dependence on foreign expertise, and began awarding degrees in 1997. [3] The GIKI offers degree programs at the BS, MS, and PhD levels in computer science, electronic engineering, engineering sciences, mechanical engineering, materials science, mathematics, physics, and humanities and management. [4]

In 1998, the Clinton Administration sanctioned the GIKI for alleged unspecified involvement in nuclear or missile activities. [5] Additionally, in 2003 a committee chaired by Lt.-Gen M. Akram Khan identified the GIKI as one of four prospective Pakistani universities for industry-university defence research collaboration. [6]

Sources:
[1] “About GIKI,” Ghulam Ishaq Khan Institute of Engineering Sciences and Technology, accessed 19 February 2011, www.giki.edu.pk; “Student Listings,” Ghulam Ishaq Khan Institute of Engineering Sciences and Technology, accessed 19 February 2011, www.giki.edu.pk.
[2] Adrian Levy and Catherine Scott-Clark, Deception: Pakistan, the United States, and the Secret Trade in Nuclear Weapons, (New York: Walker & Company, 2007), p. 144.
[3] “About GIKI,” Ghulam Ishaq Khan Institute of Engineering Sciences and Technology, accessed 19 February 2011, www.giki.edu.pk.
[4] “Academics,” Ghulam Ishaq Khan Institute of Engineering Sciences and Technology, accessed 19 February 2011, www.giki.edu.pk.
[5] “India and Pakistan Sanctions and Other Measures,” 63 Federal Register 223 (19 November 1998), pp. 64322-64342.
[6] “Varsities likely to carry out defence-related research,” Dawn (Karachi), 31 October 2003, http://archives.dawn.com.

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