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Nunn and Lugar Receive New Award at The Hague

Aug. 29, 2012

NTI co-chairman and CEO former Senator Sam Nunn and NTI board member Senator Richard Lugar received the inaugural "Nunn-Lugar Award for Promoting Nuclear Security" today at the Peace Palace in The Hague.  The award, presented jointly by the Carnegie Corporation of New York and the Carnegie Endowment for International Peace, will be presented every two years to people or organizations dedicated to advancing the cause of nuclear security.

Senators Nunn and Lugar introduced the Nunn-Lugar Act in 1991, which established the Cooperative Threat Reduction Program.  Since 1991, the program has deactivated more than 7,500 nuclear warheads, safeguarded vulnerable nuclear materials in the former Soviet states, and helped to dismantle massive stockpiles of nuclear, chemical, and biological weapons, among other notable achievements.

Carnegie Corporation president Vartan Gregorian called the Cooperative Threat Reduction Program "one of the most important pieces of legislation in the latter half of the 20th century."  Upon receiving the award, Nunn said, "To be given an award for nuclear security from the Carnegie Corporation and the Carnegie Endowment for International Peace, to receive it alongside my friend and partner Senator Richard Lugar, and to have the award named for the two of us, is a thrilling affirmation of much of my life’s work."

Read the story from the Associated Press.

Read the press release from the Carnegie Corporation of New York.

About

NTI co-chairman and CEO former Senator Sam Nunn and board member Senator Richard Lugar received a new award in their names from the Carnegie Corporation of New York and the Carnegie Endowment for International Peace.

Understanding
the Nuclear Threat

Reducing the risk of nuclear use by terrorists and nation-states requires a broad set of complementary strategies targeted at reducing state reliance on nuclear weapons, stemming the demand for nuclear weapons and denying organizations or states access to the essential nuclear materials, technologies and know-how.

In Depth