Programs & Projects

Scientific & Technical Affairs (STA)

About

The Scientific and Technical Affairs Program seeks to capture the opportunities new and emerging technologies afford while working to reduce the potential for and impact of their malevolent use.

We work with leading experts and partners to ensure a future in which new technologies and approaches—from monitoring technologies to artificial intelligence—will reduce nuclear proliferation risks, enhance future arms control agreements, improve cybersecurity of critical systems, and build transparency among nuclear weapons states.

Our recent work:

  • Outlines the risks and opportunities of adding digital and automated tools in nuclear weapons modernization
  • Exposes nuclear proliferation risks with machine learning and publicly available information
  • Builds relationships and shares best practices among cyber professionals and nuclear facilities around the world.

Program efforts are guided by a high-level Science and Technology Advisory group.

Projects

Addressing Cyber-Nuclear Security Threats

Addressing Cyber-Nuclear Security Threats

What if a hacker shut down the security system at a highly sensitive nuclear materials storage facility, giving access to terrorists seeking highly enriched uranium to make a bomb?

Cyber-Nuclear Forum

Cyber-Nuclear Forum

Building Global Cybersecurity Capacity at Nuclear Facilities

Detecting Proliferation Risks through Public Data

Detecting Proliferation Risks through Public Data

Open, increasingly digital data combined with tools for data analytics can supplement traditional nonproliferation efforts by detecting illicit proliferation

U.S.-Russia Cyber-Nuclear Weapons Dialogue

U.S.-Russia Cyber-Nuclear Weapons Dialogue

As cyber capabilities evolve and nuclear weapons systems become increasingly vulnerable to cyberattacks, the risk increases that nuclear weapons will be used by accident or miscalculation.

News & Analysis






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