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Nuclear Security Project

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Working toward a world without nuclear weapons

In 2007 former Secretary of State George P. Shultz, former Secretary of Defense William J. Perry, former Secretary of State Henry A. Kissinger and former Senator Sam Nunn joined together to form the Nuclear Security Project—a major effort to galvanize global action to reduce urgent nuclear dangers and build support for reducing reliance on nuclear weapons, ultimately ending them as a threat to the world.

Former Senator Sam Nunn, former Secretary of State George P. Shultz, former Secretary of State Henry A. Kissinger and former Secretary of Defense William J. Perry. Former Senator Sam Nunn, former Secretary of State George P. Shultz, former Secretary of State Henry A. Kissinger and former Secretary of Defense William J. Perry.

In 2007 former Secretary of State George P. Shultz, former Secretary of Defense William J. Perry, former Secretary of State Henry A. Kissinger and former Senator Sam Nunn joined together to form the Nuclear Security Project—a major effort to galvanize global action to reduce urgent nuclear dangers and build support for reducing reliance on nuclear weapons, ultimately ending them as a threat to the world.

Building on ideas set forward in a series of Wall Street Journal op-eds, by Shultz, Perry, Kissinger and Nunn, the Project links the vision of a world free of nuclear weapons with urgent steps that can be taken immediately to reduce nuclear dangers.

The Project developed in response to deep concern about the dramatic change in global threats, and a belief that there is a unique opportunity—and a short window of time—for coordinated actions to pull back from a nuclear precipice.

The Nuclear Threat Initiative (NTI) serves as the Secretariat for the Project, in cooperation with the Hoover Institution.

Building momentum and encouraging debate
The interest, momentum and growing political space that has been created to address these issues since the January 2007 article was published has been extraordinary, with strong positive responses from people all over the world.

Over two thirds of living former US Secretaries of State, Secretaries of Defense and national security advisors have endorsed the initiative.  Articles and opinion pieces by other senior statesmen from around the world and across party lines has turned the call of the American four into a global dialogue.

Former Australian Prime Minister Kevin Rudd and former Japanese Prime Minister Yasuo Fukuda announced the creation of an International Commission on Nuclear Nonproliferation and Disarmament.

The Project is designed to motivate governments to rethink their policies, change direction and act on the steps that will reduce the risk of a nuclear weapon being used by increasing understanding, awareness, support and action by policymakers, policy experts and the public around the world for purposefully and significantly changing direction and reducing these nuclear dangers.

Project Objectives
The overall objectives of the Nuclear Security Project are to:

  • Advance the substantive agenda and help close analytic gaps;
  • Expand and internationalize support and action toward the vision and steps.


Project Activities

  • Expanding support for the vision and steps through international and domestic activities and events
  • Building understanding about how to advance the steps toward a world free of nuclear weapons through consultations with a network of international project partners and networks
  • Producing a documentary film to deepen awareness of growing nuclear dangers and build support for the project goals
  • Supporting analytic studies focused on the steps needed to achieve a world free of nuclear weapons

Learn more about the Nuclear Security Project at www.NuclearSecurityProject.org or sign up to receive periodic email updates about Nuclear Security Project activities.

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Partner Organizations

Hoover Institution

The Hoover Institution on War, Revolution and Peace, Stanford University, is a public policy research center devoted to advanced study of politics, economics, and political economy—both domestic and foreign—as well as international affairs.

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Understanding
the Nuclear Threat

Reducing the risk of nuclear use by terrorists and nation-states requires a broad set of complementary strategies targeted at reducing state reliance on nuclear weapons, stemming the demand for nuclear weapons and denying organizations or states access to the essential nuclear materials, technologies and know-how.

In Depth