Aviation Industry Corporation of China

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Last Updated: January 3, 2008
Other Name: 中国航空工业集团公司
Location: Beijing, China
Subordinate To: State Administration for Science, Technology and Industry for National Defence (SASTIND)
Size: Nearly 200 subsidiaries and over 20 listed companies employing 400,000 people
Facility Status: Active

Aviation Industry Corporation of China is an expanded state-owned enterprise, under the regulatory control of the State Administration for Science, Technology and Industry for National Defense (SASTIND). It was created when the firms AVIC I & AVIC II merged in October 2008 to strengthen manufacturing capabilities to develop a large commercial aircraft. [1]

There are 10 business units within the corporation:

  • Defense
  • Transport aircraft
  • Aviation engine
  • Helicopters
  • Avionics
  • General aviation aircraft
  • Aviation research and development
  • Flight testing
  • Trade and logistics
  • Asset management

AVIC also has 33 research institutes that are among the leading science and technological research centers in China. AVIC's operations and research span 19 provinces. [2]

AVIC develops a wide range of aircraft: fighter, fighter bomber, bomber, transport, trainer, reconnaissance aircraft, helicopter, attack aircraft, general aviation aircraft, and unmanned aerial vehicles (UAVs). [3] AVIC also develops engines and ballistic missiles, such as turboprop engines, turbo-shaft engines, turbojets, turbofans, air-to-air missiles, air-to-surface missiles and ground-to-air missiles. Some aircraft developed by AVIC include J-10, FBC-1, FC-1, L-15, and JL-9. [4] AVIC also develops indigenous aircraft engine technology such as the Taihang, Qinling, and Kunlun brands. [5]

Transport and manufacturing aircraft are also areas where AVIC is expanding research and development. They have developed turbo propeller regional aircraft of MA-60, MA-600 and MA-700, and transport aircraft Y-8 & Y-12, and Z-9 helicopter. [6] AVIC is also the main developer and supplier of the ARJ21 regional aircraft and C919 commercial aircraft. The corporation aims to promote its commercial development and integrate its civil and military businesses. [7]

Several U.S. Congressional Representatives recently have expressed concern that increasing economic cooperation between U.S. companies and Chinese defense-related enterprises, including AVIC, may lead to unwitting U.S. financial and technological support for military aspects of China’s space program.[8] After an avionics joint venture between AVIC and the U.S.-based company General Electric in 2011, one congressional representative sponsored a bill to limit the transfer of high-technologies to China.[9]

Sources:
[1] Xu Dashan and Lu Haoting, "AVIC I and AVIC II to be Restructured," China Daily, 3 January 2008, www.chinadaily.com.
[2] "Corporate Profile," Aviation Industry Corporation of China, 2008, www.avic.com.cn.
[3] “中国航空工业集团公司—产品与服务 [Aviation Industry Corporation of China, Products and Services], 2012, www.avic.com.cn.
[4] “中国航空工业集团公司—产品与服务 [Aviation Industry Corporation of China, Products and Services], 2012, www.avic.com.cn.
[5] “中国航空工业集团公司—产品与服务 [Aviation Industry Corporation of China, Products and Services], 2012, www.avic.com.cn.
[6] “中国航空工业集团公司—产品与服务 [Aviation Industry Corporation of China, Products and Services], 2012, www.avic.com.cn.
[7] “中国航空工业集团公司—产品与服务 [Aviation Industry Corporation of China, Products and Services], 2012, www.avic.com.cn.
[8] “Cooperating with China on Space Program is Unwise, Wolf says,” Congressional Documents and Publications, 2 November 2011, via: http://search.proquest.com; "Annual Defence Report 2011 – Industry," Jane's Defence Industry, 2012.
[9] Jon Grevatt, "US Proposes Limits on Transfer of Developed High-Technologies to China," Jane's Defence Industry, 1 November 2011.

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