Ling Ao Nuclear Power Plant (LANPP)

View All China Facilities

Last Updated: July 25, 2012
Other Name: 岭澳核电站; Daya Bay’s Ling Ao Nuclear Facility
Location: Daya Bay near Shenzhen, Guangdong Province, about 55 km north of Hong Kong. One kilometer away from the Guangdong Daya Bar Nuclear Power Station.
Subordinate To: China Guangdong Nuclear Power Company (CGNPC); China Guangdong Nuclear Power Group (CGNPG); Daya Bay Nuclear Power Operations and Management Company (DNMC)
Size: 4 Reactors
Facility Status: Phases I and II are operational

The Ling Ao Nuclear Power Plant (LANPP) is located less than one kilometer from the Guangdong Daya Bay Nuclear Power Station and the two separate facilities combine to create the Daya Bay Nuclear Power Base. [1] Both facilities are operated by CGNPC and the majority of the reactor output is transmitted to Hong Kong. [2]

The construction of the Ling Ao plant was based on the design of the Guangdong Daya Bay plant and the total cost of the project was $4.1 billion. A group of French companies including Électricité de France (EDF), Framatome/Areva NP, and Alstom received contracts worth $2 billion of the total cost. [3] The reactors were purchased from Framatome while the construction of the facility was handled by EDF, the same company responsible for the construction of the Guangdong Daya Bay facility. [4]

Ling Ao Phase II represents one of the highest localization rates of any nuclear power plant in China. Alstom cooperated with licensee and partner Dongfang Electric Corporation to install its ARABELLE half-speed steam turbine system in Unit 4. [5] Chinese organizations helped with project management, engineering, and construction with the “equipment localization rate exceeding 50% for Unit 1 and 70% for Unit 2, respectively.” [6] Although the first fuel cycles of Units 1 and 2 were supplied by Framatome, all fuel for LANPP comes from the Yibin Fuel Plant in Sichuan Province. [7]

Phase I

Unit 1 [8]
Status: Operational
Date of Grid Connection: 26 February 2002
Net Capacity: 938 MWe
Reactor Type: CPR-1000 based on the French 900 MWe three-cooling loop design

Unit 2 [9]
Status: Operational
Date of Grid Connection: 15 December 2002
Net Capacity: 938 MWe
Reactor Type: CPR-1000 based on the French 900 MWe three-cooling loop design.

Phase II

Unit 3 [10]
Status: Operational
Date of Grid Connection: 15 July 2010
Net Capacity: 1,000 MWe
Reactor Type: Modified French Areva CPR-1000 produced by Dongfang Turbine Co., Ltd. [11]

Unit 4 [12]
Status: Operational
Date of Grid Connection: 3 May 2011
Net Capacity: 1,000 MWe
Reactor Type: Modified French Areva CPR-1000 produced by Dongfang Turbine Co., Ltd.

Sources:
[1] “Ling’ao Nuclear Plant Commissioned,” Shenzhen Daily, 29 August 2011, www.szdaily.com.
[2] “New Ling Ao II Unit Enters into Service,” World Nuclear News, 27 September 2010, www.world-nuclear-news.org.
[3] “Lingao, People's Republic of China,” Power-Technology, www.power-technology.com.
[4] Andrew C. Kadak, “Nuclear Power: ‘Made in China,’” Department of Nuclear Science and Engineering, Massachusetts Institute of Technology, accessed 21 September 2011.
[5] “Ling Ao Unit 4 Nuclear Power Plant Enters Commercial Operation,” Alstom Press Release, 8 August 2011, www.alstom.com.
[6] “Lingao NPS Phase II,” Guangdong Nuclear Power Group Press Release, 19 November 2009, www.cgnpc.com.cn.
[7] “People's Republic of China: Reactors & Services Division,” Press Kit: Areva in China, Areva Corporation, www.areva-np.com.
[8] “Nuclear Power Reactor Details – LINGAO 1,” IAEA Power Reactor Information System, www.iaea.org.
[9] “Nuclear Power Reactor Details – LINGAO 2,” IAEA Power Reactor Information System, www.iaea.org.
[10] “Nuclear Power Reactor Details – LINGAO 3,” IAEA Power Reactor Information System, www.iaea.org.
[11] Liang Jun, “Phase II of Ling Ao Nuclear Power Plant goes online,” People’s Daily [in English], 25 September 2010, www.english.peopledaily.com.cn.
[12] “Nuclear Power Reactor Details – LINGAO 4,” IAEA Power Reactor Information System, www.iaea.org.

Country Profile
Flag of China
China

This article provides an overview of China’s historical and current policies relating to nuclear, chemical, biological and missile proliferation.

Learn More →

This material is produced independently for NTI by the James Martin Center for Nonproliferation Studies at the Middlebury Institute of International Studies at Monterey and does not necessarily reflect the opinions of and has not been independently verified by NTI or its directors, officers, employees, or agents. Copyright 2017.